Blick Rothenberg

Blick Rothenberg in the Press

Print

For press enquiries please contact David Barzilay, details to the right.

  • Calls for review of HMRC systems after 100,000 hit by tax errors


    11.10.14

    Following 100,000 people being issued with incorrect tax calculations, Nimesh Shah suggests those who receive an unexpected income tax rebate do not bank the cheque, he says "HMRC can already claim tax back through tax code adjustments...amounting to a big dent in pay packets over the year."

    Source: Financial Times
  • Winners Announced For UK Government's Annual GREAT Tech Awards Competition


    10.10.14

    Six companies out of over 120 applicants have been crowned the winners of this year's GREAT Tech Awards. Blick Rothenberg have been proud sponsors of the competition for the second year in a row and will be providing the winning companies with accountancy services as part of their prize.

  • Here's how you might benefit from Tory tax cuts


    04.10.14

    Following David Cameron's pledge to cut taxes, Nimesh Shah, partner at Blick Rothenberg, discusses the impacts that cuts would entail.

    Source: Financial Times
  • Here's how you might benefit from Tory tax cuts


    02.10.14

    Nimesh Shah, partner at Blick Rothenberg, comments on how you may benefit from the recently proposed tax cuts.

  • Tax threshold promises rarely amount to much


    02.10.14

    Nimesh Shah, partner at Blick Rothenberg outlines the impacts of recently proposed tax cuts.

  • Ask the experts - 'Will smart meters really save us money?'


    27.09.14

    Nimesh Shah, partner at Blick Rothenberg, answers a reader's question on whether smart meters will really help households cut energy bills.

    Source: The Daily Telegraph
  • An end to all the uncertainty? That's No


    21.09.14

    Blick Rothenberg comments on how the "tax map of Britain would change" if Scotland gain independence.

    Source: The Sunday Telegraph
  • Tight timetable for Scottish tax reforms, warn experts


    19.09.14

    Speaking about the potential impact of Scottish independence on VAT, Paul Smith, partner at Blick Rothenberg comments; "Some tax areas are out of reach, such as VAT. ‘I don’t think that VAT would be in the scope of the devolution powers. They cannot do much about VAT as it is pretty much a European tax.

    ‘Zero rating is agreed at European level so the UK government could not change that for Scotland. But they might be able to look at the VAT proceeds from Scottish sales and whether that could be shared with Scotland.

    'Another area they could look at is air passenger duty - that could be devolved as it is not EU controlled,' he added.

    He also comments on concerns around the new income tax structure; ‘There are practical difficulties with the SRIT – they will need to decide whether this applies to residence or place of work, for example if you live in England and work in Scotland, and vice versa. Will your tax status be defined by where you work or where you live? This is unclear even now. If it went by reference to the work place, it would be easier to administer,’

  • Scotland's No vote: what it means for your money


    19.09.14

    Discussing the potential impact of Scottish independence, Blick Rothenberg comments on how the “tax map of Britain would change”.

  • Scotland briefing: tax policy after no vote


    18.09.14

    Paul Smith, partner at Blick Rothenberg, comments on the potential impact of Scottish Independence on VAT and the new income tax structure; "‘I don’t think that VAT would be in the scope of the devolution powers. They cannot do much about VAT as it is pretty much a European tax,’

    ‘Zero rating is agreed at European level so the UK government could not change that for Scotland. But they might be able to look at the VAT proceeds from Scottish sales and whether that could be shared with Scotland.

    'Another area they could look at is air passenger duty - that could be devolved as it is not EU controlled,'

    ‘There are practical difficulties with the SRIT – they will need to decide whether this applies to residence or place of work, for example if you live in England and work in Scotland, and vice versa. Will your tax status be defined by where you work or where you live? This is unclear even now. If it went by reference to the work place, it would be easier to administer,’

Load more articles 11-20 (of 74)